Scientific Mode

 


NOTATION & PRECISION

You can change your decimal-notation with the notation button, which shows STD by default. Pressing the notation button will cycle through the following notation modes:

  • STD – Prints in standard notation with all significant decimal digits up to the current precision.
  • FIX – Prints in fixed notation with a fixed number of decimal digits equal to the current precision.
  • SCI – Prints in scientific notation with a fixed number of decimal digits equal to the current precision.
  • ENG – Prints in engineering notation with a fixed number of decimal digits equal to the current precision.

You can select your decimal-precision by pressing and holding the notation button to access the precision button. The precision button always shows the current precision, which by default shows P:12 since the default precision is 12.

 


ANGLE UNIT

The angle-unit button can be pressed to select one of three modes for angle-based calculations. The three modes are degrees, radians, and gradians and the button will respectively show the following abbreviations: DEG, RAD and GRD.

Most angle-based calculations in your history will show the angle that they were calculated at as seen in the following examples:

sind(30) = 0.5
cosr(0) = 1.
tang(200) = 0.

Sometimes you won’t see an angle-unit abbreviation in the history because the argument was not applied as a real angle. Imaginary arguments are a good example:

sin(5i) = 74.20321057779i

 


UNIT CONVERSIONS

Unit Conversions are really simple with CalcTastic. Simply type in a number, press the convert button and follow the menu. Here’s an example where we’ll convert 2 hours into minutes:

2Conv

Select Time

help_conversion1

Choose Hours

help_conversion2

Choose Minutes

help_conversion3

The converted value will be inserted into your calculation and a copy of the entire conversion will be saved in your history:

Time: 2h → min = 120.

 


STATISTICS

CalcTastic has a a unique feature where you can get a series of statistics about the values on the stack. This is extremely useful and very easy to use. Simply place any number of values on the stack by pressing = in between each value:

help_statistics1

Then simply press the Stats button and you’ll be presented with 15 different statistics about the numbers on the stack.

help_statistics2

help_statistics3

 


PHYSICAL CONSTANTS

To access the built-in list of physical constants, simply press the Cnst button. Select the constant you want and it will be inserted into your current calculation:

help_contants

 


DEGREE/MINUTE/SECOND

The DMS button is used for converting back and forth between Degrees and Degrees, Minutes, Seconds (DMS hereafter). See the following examples:

Degrees to DMS

7.62DMS7°37’12.0″

DMS to Degrees

5DMS5DMS6DMS5°5’6.0″DMS5.085

 


FRACTIONS

The abc button can be used to enter a fraction or convert back-and-forth between decimal and fraction form. You can also convert a fraction between mixed and common form. Here are some examples:

Enter in Mixed form…

2abc3abc7=237

Enter in Common form…

4abc32=18

Convert Decimal to Fraction

6.5abc132

Cycle forms and back to Decimal

132abc612abc6.5

* Fractions will be automatically reduced for you.

* Common form is the default when converting from decimal to fraction.

 


COMPLEX NUMBERS

Complex numbers can be entered in either rectangular form or polar form (full version only). Here are some examples:

Rectangular form…

2+3i=2+3i

Polar form…

23=2∠3

You can switch between forms for any individual complex number by pressing the i or button. Assuming we’re in radians, lets take the previous answer and switch to rectangular and back:

2∠3i-1.979984993201 +0.28224001612i2∠3

Polar-form complex numbers will always be reduced to the simplest form (positive magnitude with a principal argument). Here is an example in degrees:

5±370=(-5)∠d 370 = 5∠-170

Polar-form complex number answers in your history will also always print in the current angle-unit. If you follow up the previous example by changing to radians RAD, the entry in history will change to:

(-5)∠d 370 = 5∠-2.96705972839

When using rectangular-form complex numbers in a calculation, you may want to surround them with parenthesis in order to get the proper order of operations you desire. Consider the following two examples:

1+2i×3=1+6i

(1+2i)×3=3+6i

You can also use parenthesis (and other operations) within complex numbers. This is because all complex numbers are created with normal calculations. Even the polar angle is considered a calculation. Here is an example in degrees:

7(360÷3)=49∠120

Even fractions can be used in complex numbers, like so:

7+1abc2i=7+12i

 


OTHER FUNCTIONS

The rest of the functions in the scientific-mode are fairly easy to use, so my goal here is to simply give an example (or two) of each. Press CLR before each example:

 

GENERAL

What is the ceiling of 5.2?

Ceil5.2=6.

What is the floor of -4.4?

Floor±4.4=-5.

What is the absolute value of -3?

±3Abs=3.

What is the value of 19 mod 3?

19Mod3=1.

What is the reciprocal of 7.5?

1/X7.5=0.133333333333

What is 9 squared?

9=81.

What is the square root of 64?

√x64=8.

What is 5 to the power of 3?

5yx3=125.

What is the 4th root of 128?

28x√y4=2.300326633791

 

PERCENTAGES

What is 5% of 250?

250×5%=12.5

What percentage is 5 of 250?

5÷250%=2.

What is 250 plus 5%?

250+5%=262.5

What is 250 minus 5%?

2505%=237.5

What is the percent-change going from 7 to 8 (markup)?

7Δ%8=14.28571428571

What is the percent-change going from 8 to 7 (margin)?

8Δ%7=-12.5

 

TRIGONOMETRIC

What is the sine of 2π (in radians)?

sin2×π=0.

What is the cosine of 180 (in degrees)?

cos180=-1.

What is the tangent of 250 (in grads)?

tan250=1.

What is the arcsine of 1 (in radians)?

asin1=1.570796326795

What is the arccosine of 0 (in degrees)?

acos0=90.

What is the arctangent of 0 (in grads)?

atan0=0.

 

LOGARITHMS

What is the natural log of 2e?

ln2×e=1.69314718056

What is the base-10 log of 10000?

log1EEX4=4.

What is the base-2 log of 64?

64log÷2log=6.

What is e^5?

ex5=148.4131591026

What is 10^5?

10x5=100,000.

 

STATISTICAL

What is the factorial of 7?

7x!=5,040.

What is nPr(8, 2)?

8nPr2=56.

What is nCr(8, 2)?

8nCr2=28.

Random decimal between 0 and 1?

Rdm

Random integer between 0 and 100?

100Rdm

 

COMPLEX

What is the real part of 2+3i?

Re2+3i=2

What is the imaginary part of 2+3i?

Im2+3i=3

What is the argument of 2∠4 (in degrees)?

Arg24=4

What is the magnitude (absolute value) of 2∠4?

(24)Abs=2

What is the conjugate of 2+3i?

Con2+3i=2−3i

 


ORDER OF OPERATIONS

If you omit parenthesis, here is the order of operations for the Scientific Mode. Anything on the same line has equal priority as other items on that line, anything below has lower priority, and anything above has higher priority:

5 –
4 – yx x√y
3 – nPr nCr Δ%
2 – × ÷ Mod
1 – +